ELECTROCUTION - WHAT TO DO? BASICS AND TUTORIALS

The following is taken in part from the OSHA, NIOSH, NSC regulations, and the American Heart Association recommendations. These are steps that should be taken in the event of a possible electrocution
(cardiac arrest).

You need to refer to the actual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instructions for complete and detailed requirements, and to take CPR training.

• First of all, you must recognize that an emergency exists. Timing is everything. The time between the accident and arrival of paramedics is crucial. Call 911 immediately. Don’t delay.

• Don’t touch the person if he or she is still in contact with the live circuit.

• Shut off the power.

• Stay with the person while someone else contacts the paramedics, who have training in the basics of life support. In most localities, telephoning 911 will get you to the paramedics.

• Have the caller verify that the call was made and that help is on the way.

• Don’t move the person.

• Check for bleeding; stop the bleeding if it occurs.

• If the person is unconscious, check for breathing.

• The ABCs of CPR are: airway must be clear; breathing is a must, either by the victim or the rescuer; and circulation (check pulse).

• Perform CPR if the victim is not breathing— within 4 minutes is critical. If the brain is deprived of oxygen for more than 4 minutes, brain damage will occur. If it is deprived of oxygen for more than 10 minutes, the survival rate is 1 in 100. CPR keeps oxygenated blood flowing to the brain and heart.

• Defibrillation may be necessary to reestablish a normal heartbeat. Ventricular fibrillation is common with electric shock, which causes the heartbeat to be uneven and unable to properly pump blood.

• By now, the trained paramedics should have arrived to apply advanced care.


• When it comes to an electrical shock, timing is everything!


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