UPLIFT & INSULATOR SWING ON TRANSMISSION LINES TOWER SPOTTING CONSIDERATION TUTORIALS

Uplift
On steep inclined spans the low point may fall beyond the lower support; this indicates that the conductor in the uphill span exerts a negative or upward pull on the lower tower. The amount of this upward pull is equal to the weight of the conductor from the lower tower to the low point in the sag.

Should the upward pull of the uphill span be greater than the downward load of the next adjacent span, actual uplift would be caused, and the conductor would tend to swing clear of the tower. It is important that abrupt changes in elevation of the structures should not occur, so that the conductor will not tend to swing clear of any structure even at low temperatures.

This condition would be indicated if the 0#F curve of the template can be adjusted to hang free of the center support and just touch the adjacent supports on either side. In northern states it would be well to add a curve to the template for the below-zero temperatures experienced.

Insulator Swing
The uplift condition should not even be approached in laying out suspension insulator construction; that is, each tower should carry a considerable weight of conductor. The minimum weight that should be allowed on any structure may be logically determined by finding the transverse angle to which the insulator string may swing without reducing the clearance from the conductor to the structure too greatly.

Also, the ratio of vertical weight to horizontal wind load should be limited to avoid insulator swing beyond this angle. The maximum wind is usually assumed at a temperature of 60#F. The wind pressure, measured in pounds per square foot, to be used in swing calculations is a matter of judgment and depends on local conditions.

Under high-wind conditions it is reasonable to require somewhat less than normal clearances. Generally a clearance corresponding to about 75% of the flashover value of the insulator is adequate.

The insulator will swing in the direction of the resultant of the vertical and horizontal forces acting on the insulator string.

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